What is Emotional Eating ?

woman looking at junk food green vegetables shaped lightbulb

Emotional eating (or stress eating) is using food to make yourself feel better—eating to satisfy emotional needs, rather than to satisfy physical hunger. You might reach for a pint of ice cream when you’re feeling down, order a pizza if you’re bored or lonely, or swing by the drive-through after a stressful day at work.

Occasionally using food as a pick me up, a reward, or to celebrate isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But when eating is your primary emotional coping mechanism—when your first impulse is to open the refrigerator whenever you’re stressed, upset, angry, lonely, exhausted, or bored—you get stuck in an unhealthy cycle where the real feeling or problem is never addressed.

Emotional hunger can’t be filled with food. Eating may feel good in the moment, but the feelings that triggered the eating are still there. And you often feel worse than you did before because of the unnecessary calories you’ve just consumed.

 

  • Emotional hunger comes on suddenly. It hits you in an instant and feels overwhelming and urgent. Physical hunger, on the other hand, comes on more gradually. The urge to eat doesn’t feel as dire or demand instant satisfaction (unless you haven’t eaten for a very long time).

 

  • Emotional hunger isn’t satisfied once you’re full. You keep wanting more and more, often eating until you’re uncomfortably stuffed. Physical hunger, on the other hand, doesn’t need to be stuffed. You feel satisfied when your stomach is full.

 

  • Emotional hunger often leads to regret, guilt, or shame. When you eat to satisfy physical hunger, you’re unlikely to feel guilty or ashamed because you’re simply giving your body what it needs. If you feel guilty after you eat, it’s likely because you know deep down that you’re not eating for nutritional reasons.

11 Super foods for Stress Relief

Green leafy vegetables

It’s tempting to reach for a burger when stressed, but go green at lunch instead. Green leafy vegetables like spinach contain folate, which produces dopamine, a pleasure-inducing brain chemical, helping you keep calm.

Turkey breast

The amino acid, found in protein-containing foods, helps produce serotonin, the chemical that regulate hunger and feelings of happiness and well-being. Other foods high in tryptophan include nuts, seeds, tofu, fish, lentils, oats, beans, and eggs.

Oatmeal

If you’re already a carb lover, it’s likely that nothing can come between you and a doughnut when stress hits. Don’t completely deny the craving.  Carbohydrates can help the brain make serotonin, the same substance regulated by antidepressants. But instead of reaching for that sugary bear claw, go for complex carbs. Stress can cause your blood sugar to rise so a complex carb like oatmeal won’t contribute to your already potential spike in blood glucose.

Yogurt

As bizarre as it may sound, the bacteria in your gut might be contributing to stress. Research has shown that the brain signals to the gut, which is why stress can inflame gastrointestinal symptoms; communication may flow the other way too, from gut to brain. A  study among 36 healthy women revealed that consuming probiotics in yogurt reduced brain activity in areas that handle emotion, including stress compared to people who consumed yogurt without probiotics or no yogurt at all. 

Salmon

When you’re stressed, it can ratchet up anxiety hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. The omega-3 fatty acids in salmon have anti-inflammatory properties that may help counteract the negative effects of stress hormones.

Blueberries

When you’re stressed, there’s a battle being fought inside you. The antioxidants and phytonutrients found in berries fight in your defence, helping improve your body’s response to stress.

Pistachios

When you have an ongoing loop of negative thoughts playing in your mind, doing something repetitive with your hands may help silence your inner monologue. Think knitting or kneading bread—or even shelling nuts like pistachios or peanuts. The rhythmic moves will help you relax. Plus, the added step of cracking open a shell slows down your eating, making pistachios a diet- friendly snack. What’s more, pistachios have heart-health benefits. Pistachios may reduce the stress by lowering blood pressure and the heart rate.

Dark chocolate

Calling all chocoholics: a regular healthy indulgence (just a bite, not a whole bar!) of dark chocolate might have the power to regulate your stress levels. Also, the antioxidants in cocoa trigger the walls of your blood vessels to relax, lowering blood pressure and improving circulation.

Milk

Milk is an excellent source of vitamin D, a nutrient that might boost happiness. People who had sufficient vitamin D levels had a reduced risk of panic disorders compared to subjects with the lowest levels of vitamin D. Other foods high in vitamin D include salmon, egg yolks, and fortified cereal.

Seeds

Flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds are all great sources of magnesium (as are leafy greens, yogurt, nuts, and fish). Loading up on the mineral may help regulate emotions. Magnesium has been shown to help alleviate depression, fatigue, and irritability.

Cashews

One ounce of nuts packs 11% of the daily recommended value of zinc, an essential mineral that may help reduce anxiety. When researchers gave zinc supplements to people who were diagnosed with both anxiety symptoms  and deficient zinc levels. The patients saw a 31% decrease in anxiety. This is likely because zinc affects the levels of a nerve chemical that influences mood. Other food that contains zinc like beef, chicken, and yogurt

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